Arch - Brick Development Association

Construction known as an ‘arch ring’, made of truncated wedge-shaped voussoirs that by mutual pressure stay in place, set out in a curved form to span an opening and carry a superimposed load. The Gothic Arch can be formed from a lancet, drop or equilateral arch. The lancet is a sharply pointed two-centered or acute type with the radii greater than the span. The drop arch is a pointed arch with its centers on the springing-line and with the span longer than the radius and the equilateral is a pointed two-centered arch of two arcs, the radii of which are equal to the span.

Construction known as an ‘arch ring’, made of truncated wedge-shaped voussoirs that by mutual pressure stay in place, set out in a curved form to span an opening and carry a superimposed load.

Figure 3.1 Gothic Arch scale 1 20 elevation

Figure 3.1 Gothic Arch scale 1:20 elevation

The Gothic Arch can be formed from a lancet, drop or equilateral arch. The lancet is a sharply pointed two-centered or acute type with the radii greater than the span. The drop arch is a pointed arch with its centers on the springing-line and with the span longer than the radius and the equilateral is a pointed two-centered arch of two arcs, the radii of which are equal to the span.

Figure 3.2 Tudor Arch scale 1 20 elevation

Figure 3.2 Tudor Arch scale 1:20 elevation

Perpendicular Arch, similar to a depressed arch, but with shanks starting at quarter circles (with centres on the springing line) continuing as straight lines to the apex. It is very depressed, and often expressed as a single lintel.

Figure 3.3 Venetian Arch scale 1 20 elevation

Figure 3.3 Venetian Arch scale 1:20 elevation

A semicircular arch framing two semicircular-headed lights separated by a colonnette above which is a roundel in the space between the tops of the smaller arches and the main intrados.

Figure 3.4 Triangular Arch scale 1 20 elevation

Figure 3.4 Triangular Arch scale 1:20 elevation

A triangular pseudo-arch of two courses of stretchers at an acute angle, lean together at a mitred apex, common in Anglo-Saxon architecture, also called pediment or mitre arch.

Figure 3.5 Bullseye Arch scale 1 20 elevation

Figure 3.5 Bullseye Arch scale 1:20 elevation

The Bullseye Arch is commonly used for openings increasing the volume of light entering the internal space The full circle of brick voussoirs remain in compression.

Figure 3.6 Horseshoe Arch scale 1 20 evelation

Figure 3.6 Horseshoe Arch scale 1:20 elevation

Usually associated with Islamic styles, formed from a semicircular arch on straight piers narrowing towards the base below the springing-line. Other types include a pointed horseshoe arch and a round horseshoe arch as shown above.

Figure 3.7 Jack Arch scale 1 20 elevation

Figure 3.7 Jack Arch scale 1:20 elevation

The Jack Arch is a segmental Arch spanning between iron beams, thus forming a vault.

Figure 3.8 Segmental Arch scale 1 20 elevation

Figure 3.8 Segmental Arch scale 1:20 elevation

With its centre below the springing-line, a Segmental Arch can either be semicircular or pointed which would allow for two centres below the springing-line.

Figure 3.9 Semicircular Arch scale 1 20 elevation

Figure 3.9 Semicircular Arch scale 1:20 elevation

A Semicircular Arch will always have its centre on the springing-line.

Figure 3.10 Multi Centered Arch scale 1 20 elevation

Figure 3.10 Multi-Centered Arch  scale 1:20 elevation

Also known as a three-centered Arch with two arcs struck from the springing-line with a central arc struck from below it. A depressed three centres arch has the central arc struck from a point very much lower that the springing-line.